Girl on Sculpture, V&A Waterfront

Here are two final images from our visit a couple of weeks ago to Cape Town and the V&A Waterfront: a young girl climbing on a metal sculpture near to the Zeitz-Museum of Contemporary Art Africa. Rob thinks the girl is lost in the image; I think the image of the girl is subtle. Decide for yourself. Leica D-Lux, processed in Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro.

Zeitz MOCAA – The Tunnels

Below ground, at the Zeitz-MOCAA in Cape Town, run what they call ‘the tunnels’ – passages underneath the structure that housed the wheels and chutes that controlled the grain elevator. Spaced out at intervals along the passageways are low benches or tables, stacked high with prints of artwork, with an open invitation to everyone to take one. With Rob and me, that made two, which are hanging now in her workroom, here in Johannesburg. The tunnels make for some interesting images. With their almost monochromatic tones, most would look good in colour or in black and white, so I’ve done […]

Zeitz MOCAA – Four Images

Here are four rather different images of the fantastic Zeitz MOCAA at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town: two are in colour, two are in black and white; three are essentially abstract, while the fourth, showing a film projected onto a wall in the Dust House, has the puzzling air of a non-sequitur or riddle. All were shot on the Leica D-Lux and processed in Lightroom, before the finishing touches were applied either in Silver Efex Pro or Colour Efex.  

Cape Town Harbour

Here is an image, of Cape Town harbour, looking towards the old Customs House and the red Clock Tower and the open sea beyond, that gives me pleasure. The composition is simple, conventional, but to my eye satisfying in its calm regularity. But it is the light that excites – the cloudiness in the sky, the lyrical reflections, remind me of a watercolour, while the quay and the yacht and the buildings across the water have the precision of a photograph. To my eye, anyway – you may see it differently! Shot with the Leica D-Lux.

On Hout Bay Beach

We went for a walk, one evening in Cape Town, along Hout Bay Beach. The sun was flaring out behind the mountain, the sea was calm, and a pale mist enveloped the walkers. Here are two images. For those who are interested, both were shot with the Leica D-Lux.

Of penguins and travel

We have been up and down the country, Rob and I, over the past two weeks – two weeks ago we were in Cape Town, on business, and last weekend we drove a rented car up to the Marakele National Park, near Thabazimbi in Limpopo Province. Cape Town was gorgeous, blue skies, sunshine – and of course no rain. The water situation is critical. Every sip and drop precious. We stayed with my mom, and over the weekend took her out for lunch at The Cellars restaurant at the Hohenort, where we took in an exhibition of Ardmore ceramics. This […]

A week is a long time in politics

A week in politics is more than a long time, sometimes: it can mark the beginning or the end of an era. It is hard to believe that it was just this time last week that the man who sold his country, former president Jacob Zuma, was flatly refusing to step down from office. By Friday, in the State of the Nation address, a new man, President Cyril Ramaphosa, was resetting the tone for the nation, and Zuma was toast. Those who had depended on Zuma’s favours, who had enabled his vices, who had grown fat and arrogant along with […]

President Ramaphosa

We have a new President. Cyril Ramaphosa elected by Parliament today. A new tone in his remarks to the House of dignity, humility, respect and commitment. And not a word about his predecessor. Needless to say, I watched his election and stood and applauded, along with millions of South Africans.

Official Obama portraits

Wow! Fabulous! The Obamas show the world what really is great about America (and forget about the little orange-faced turd). via The Obamas’ portraits are not what you’d expect and that’s why they’re great – The Washington Post

‘Inxeba’ – Distilled

Bergman-esque in its intensity, the South African film Inxeba – The Wound – has rightly won praise and awards around the world, along with the usual quota, for a film that speaks openly, and painfully, about homosexuality, masculinity, homophobia and ‘traditional culture’ in an African community, of threats and vitriol. In Cape Town, supposedly a bastion of the arts and enlightenment, the film was withdrawn by distributors Ster Kinekor, in an act of cowardice and betrayal. All of which is to say, there is a moral imperative to see it, and a duty to support the actors and director. But […]