Zebra to the rescue

To maintain my sanity, or at least the appearance thereof, from time to time I have to take a break from what another photo blogger calls the work that pays the bills, and process an image.

Here, as a foretaste of an upcoming posting, is just one image, of a pair of zebra in the Marakele National Park, more for my own relief than anyone else’s.

I hope you enjoy the image anyway.

Nikon D500, Nikon 70-300mm zoom, processed in Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro.

 

Zebra, Marakele # 1

Girl on Sculpture, V&A Waterfront

Here are two final images from our visit a couple of weeks ago to Cape Town and the V&A Waterfront: a young girl climbing on a metal sculpture near to the Zeitz-Museum of Contemporary Art Africa.

Rob thinks the girl is lost in the image; I think the image of the girl is subtle. Decide for yourself.

Leica D-Lux, processed in Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro.

Girl on Sculpture, V&A Waterfront # 2Girl on sculpture, V&A Waterfront

Zeitz MOCAA – The Tunnels

Below ground, at the Zeitz-MOCAA in Cape Town, run what they call ‘the tunnels’ – passages underneath the structure that housed the wheels and chutes that controlled the grain elevator. Spaced out at intervals along the passageways are low benches or tables, stacked high with prints of artwork, with an open invitation to everyone to take one.

With Rob and me, that made two, which are hanging now in her workroom, here in Johannesburg.

The tunnels make for some interesting images. With their almost monochromatic tones, most would look good in colour or in black and white, so I’ve done these in both.

Again, shot with the Leica D-Lux, processed in Lightroom and in Silver Efex Pro or Colour Efex.

Zeitz MOCAA – Four Images

Here are four rather different images of the fantastic Zeitz MOCAA at the V&A Waterfront in Cape Town: two are in colour, two are in black and white; three are essentially abstract, while the fourth, showing a film projected onto a wall in the Dust House, has the puzzling air of a non-sequitur or riddle.

All were shot on the Leica D-Lux and processed in Lightroom, before the finishing touches were applied either in Silver Efex Pro or Colour Efex.

 

On Hout Bay Beach

We went for a walk, one evening in Cape Town, along Hout Bay Beach. The sun was flaring out behind the mountain, the sea was calm, and a pale mist enveloped the walkers. Here are two images.

For those who are interested, both were shot with the Leica D-Lux.

Photographing rhino

Photographing rhino, in my amateur experience, can be a challenge. Mostly the problem is finding them in the first place, and when you do see them they tend to be just standing around, galumphing great hulks, or snoozing in the shade of a tree, where the light is awful.

If you’re a pro, you wait for the right moment – and waiting can mean a long, long time, before something interesting happens. When you’re not a pro, just someone like me, you’re either driving, with limited time at your disposal, or you’re on a game drive, which means someone else is driving, and there are a whole lot of others with you, who want to look, snap a picture, and get a move on.

So I was really glad to get these two, contrasting images, one somnolent, the other full of energy and movement, and work them up in black and white. They were taken during our visit to the St Lucia Wetlands, but across the road as it were, in the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve, a mere 45 minutes from the town itself.

It’s worth a visit.

The crocs of St Lucia

As I have mentioned, there are crocs enough in the St Lucia Wetlands to form a walkway across the water, Crocodile Dundee-style, should anyone want to make so bold. Or be so foolish.

But these images are not from the wild, they are from the Crocodile Centre located in the reserve, instead. We were lucky enough to come across one female, in a state of suspension, trance-like, humped over a shallow hole she had dredged in the sand, and watch as her body periodically arched, while she dropped into the hole one soft, glistening crocodile egg after another.

St Lucia ‘seconds’

One of the things about St Lucia that makes things a little tricky for the photographer is the vegetation – dense, lush, green, all too often in the way of a clear shot, especially for the traveling amateur or tourist who does not have the luxury of lying in wait, sometimes for days or weeks, to make that definitive image.

These images are definitely ‘seconds’, not the first quality – but I share them because of the moments they capture: a giraffe, with an ox-pecker or tick bird over one eye, a clutch of zebra resting on one another’s rumps, a zebra seeming to laugh, or bark, or whinny, an impala (perhaps the best shot of the lot, in photographic terms) turning to look back at us.

Kudu coquette

This young kudu bull, posing beside a tree in the St Lucia Marine Park, seemed almost coquettish as he looked at me looking at him through the lens of my camera.

[In the original version of this post I made the embarrassing error of referring to the bull as female – I fear the coquettishness had me tied up in knots!]