Puente Nuevo, Ronda

Puente Nuevo, the ‘new’ bridge, dates to the 18th-century and spans the 100m-deep Tajo Gorge, connecting the old and new parts of Ronda.

Ronda was a surprise: approaching up a steep hill, and entering the town through drab, less-than-interesting neighbourhoods, we wondered if we had made a mistake, booking for two nights. We checked into our hotel, headed out to explore, and immediately fell in love.

Indeed, Ronda quickly became one of our favourite towns in all of Andalucia, and we would happily have stayed for several days more.

 

The Rain in Spain Falls Mainly on Grazalema

The little white village of Grazalema, one of the pueblos blancos of that rugged region, has the highest rainfall in Spain. True to form, lowering dark clouds clung to the hills and mountains when we visited. We parked on the outskirts of town, walked down the hill to find a beer and something to eat – and suddenly, while we were eating, the clouds burst like a sack full of liquid, and a torrent of water rushed down the street. Needless to say, we got drenched walking back.

Zahara de la Sierra – Castles in the Sky

Between Sevilla and Ronda lies the Parque Natural Sierra de Grazalema, a rugged, mountainous country of dramatic views and towering skies, where pueblos blancos – the white villages – cling to the rock. This is Zahara de la Sierra, where we stopped for lunch.

 

Castles in the Sky, Zahara de la Sierra.jpg